RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (2024)

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RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (1)

Culture

Eight new books to inspire far-flung wanderlust

Thanks to the easing of COVID-19 testing requirements, traveling abroad is easier than it’s been in years. The following titles, out this summer, will inspire you to think outside the museum, elevate your vacation game, and maybe even spend some solitary time in the desert. See you out there.

Art Escapes: Hidden Art Experiences Outside the Museum
By Grace Banks

Given how overrun a museum can be these days—just try to get close and personal with the Mona Lisa—it’s well worth seeking out artworks outside the confines of its four walls. Here to help is this photographic ode to publicly displayed artworks from around the world, featuring works such as the Digital Orca (a pixelated outdoor sculpture in Vancouver) and the large-scale The Future Is Now sculpture in Saudi Arabia, in addition to pieces from Ghana, Scandinavia, Mexico City, and beyond. Consider it a bucket list for a lifetime of art-centric adventure.

(gestalten, June)

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (2)
RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (3)

A Home Away From Home: Exceptional Houses for Discerning Travelers
By Wim Pauwels

As this book ably demonstrates, vacation rentals have gotten decidedly upscale. This coffee table collection captures 33 of the world’s most appealing—from Greek beach houses and Swiss chalets to a secluded tropical retreat in Brazil and a sprawling seaside estate in the Caribbean. Best of all, each of these homes are available to rent (information is included), which means this is basically a travel brochure for your next blowout vacation.

(Beta-Plus, June)

One of the pleasures of traveling is getting to know a place, to immerse yourself in its history, its culture, its people. This book, written by an editor at Vice, aims to do that for an entire continent, while also righting past wrongs (including the misconception referenced by the title, alongside addressing how charitable efforts have backfired) and subverting longstanding stereotypes (such as the one that the entire continent is plagued by poverty). Faloyin chronicles the politics, the foods, even the sports of the African nations, with a humor that calls to mind having a trusted friend guide you on your next trip.

(Norton, September 6)

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (4)
RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (5)

Travels Across the Roof of the World: A Himalayan Memoir
By William and Anne Frej

Over 40 years, husband-and-wife duo William and Anne Frej—longtime photographers who have documented everything from remote Mayan ruins to religious festivals in the American Southwest—took 20 trips to the Himalayas, documenting their experiences (and their views) via breathtaking photography. This photo book-cum-memoir collects their best images, along with their thoughts on the remote region’s changing cultural and literal landscape. A stunning book that radiates empathy for the people who live there, their rich culture, and their resilience.

(GFT, July)

Jorge Luis Borges & María Kodama: The Infinite Encounter
By Cristina Carrillo de Albornoz

Jorge Luis Borges revolutionized fiction in the 20th century. He spent the last 11 years of his life with María Kodama, though he met her decades earlier at a bookshop in Buenos Aires. (She was 37 years his junior and inspired his tender poem, The Moon.) This book includes photos of them from their time together, alongside Borges’ poems and manuscripts written during that period. The images, largely black and white, capture their romance, while the writing offers insight into the mind of the quintessential Argentine writer. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself booking a trip to Buenos Aires.

(Assouline, July)

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (6)
RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (7)

A Place in the World: Finding the Meaning of Home
By Frances Mayes

If Mayes’ Under the Tuscan Sun is the book that launched 1,000 trips to Italy, her latest might inspire those lucky enough to do permanent remote work. (Or encourage those who can’t.) Through a series of essays, she chronicles her time living in France, Mexico, and yes, Italy, contemplating what defines a home, no matter the locale—and no matter the owner, as she includes a number of friends’ homes in her collection.

(Crown, August 23)

Colorful World
By Mira Mikati

Vacationers choose their destinations for all sorts of reasons: cost, convenience, a lifelong desire to visit a particular place. This charming book suggests an alternative motivation: color. By pairing vivid photographs with the globe-trotting author’s own musings, Mikati—born in Lebanon, raised in Paris, extensively traveled—highlights 50 locales, each chosen for being especially vivid, like the so-called Rainbow Mountain in the Peruvian Andes, where mineral deposits turn the mountainsides into ribbons of color. Certain to brighten your coffee table, if not your future travel plans.

(Rizzoli, August 30)

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (8)
RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (9)

Imagine a City: A Pilot’s Journey Across the Urban World
By Mark Vanhoenacker

Many of us have longed for the life of a pilot, paid to explore the remote corners of the world. Vanhoenacker actually lived it, having left the world of academia to fly commercial airliners for nearly 20 years. This memoir tells of his impression of the cities he encountered. He chronicles experiences in Abu Dhabi and London, Delhi and Sapporo, each one inspiring him to investigate cultural totems like road signs and poetry. A welcome reminder of the joy of hopping on a plane and heading somewhere new—whether you’re in the co*ckpit or coach.

(Knopf, July 5)

Art Escapes: Hidden Art Experiences Outside the Museum
By Grace Banks

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (10)

Given how overrun a museum can be these days—just try to get close and personal with the Mona Lisa—it’s well worth seeking out artworks outside the confines of its four walls. Here to help is this photographic ode to publicly displayed artworks from around the world, featuring works such as the Digital Orca (a pixelated outdoor sculpture in Vancouver) and the large-scale The Future Is Now sculpture in Saudi Arabia, in addition to pieces from Ghana, Scandinavia, Mexico City, and beyond. Consider it a bucket list for a lifetime of art-centric adventure.

(gestalten, June)

A Home Away From Home: Exceptional Houses for Discerning Travelers
By Wim Pauwels

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (11)

As this book ably demonstrates, vacation rentals have gotten decidedly upscale. This coffee table collection captures 33 of the world’s most appealing—from Greek beach houses and Swiss chalets to a secluded tropical retreat in Brazil and a sprawling seaside estate in the Caribbean. Best of all, each of these homes are available to rent (information is included), which means this is basically a travel brochure for your next blowout vacation.

(Beta-Plus, June)

Africa Is Not a Country
By Dipo Faloyin

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (12)

One of the pleasures of traveling is getting to know a place, to immerse yourself in its history, its culture, its people. This book, written by an editor at Vice, aims to do that for an entire continent, while also righting past wrongs (including the misconception referenced by the title, alongside addressing how charitable efforts have backfired) and subverting longstanding stereotypes (such as the one that the entire continent is plagued by poverty). Faloyin chronicles the politics, the foods, even the sports of the African nations, with a humor that calls to mind having a trusted friend guide you on your next trip.

(Norton, September 6)

Travels Across the Roof of the World: A Himalayan Memoir
By William and Anne Frej

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (13)

Over 40 years, husband-and-wife duo William and Anne Frej—longtime photographers who have documented everything from remote Mayan ruins to religious festivals in the American Southwest—took 20 trips to the Himalayas, documenting their experiences (and their views) via breathtaking photography. This photo book-cum-memoir collects their best images, along with their thoughts on the remote region’s changing cultural and literal landscape. A stunning book that radiates empathy for the people who live there, their rich culture, and their resilience.

(GFT, July)

Jorge Luis Borges & María Kodama: The Infinite Encounter
By Cristina Carrillo de Albornoz

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (14)

Jorge Luis Borges revolutionized fiction in the 20th century. He spent the last 11 years of his life with María Kodama, though he met her decades earlier at a bookshop in Buenos Aires. (She was 37 years his junior and inspired his tender poem, The Moon.) This book includes photos of them from their time together, alongside Borges’ poems and manuscripts written during that period. The images, largely black and white, capture their romance, while the writing offers insight into the mind of the quintessential Argentine writer. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself booking a trip to Buenos Aires.

(Assouline, July)

A Place in the World: Finding the Meaning of Home
By Frances Mayes

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (15)

If Mayes’ Under the Tuscan Sun is the book that launched 1,000 trips to Italy, her latest might inspire those lucky enough to do permanent remote work. (Or encourage those who can’t.) Through a series of essays, she chronicles her time living in France, Mexico, and yes, Italy, contemplating what defines a home, no matter the locale—and no matter the owner, as she includes a number of friends’ homes in her collection.

(Crown, August 23)

Colorful World
By Mira Mikati

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (16)

Vacationers choose their destinations for all sorts of reasons: cost, convenience, a lifelong desire to visit a particular place. This charming book suggests an alternative motivation: color. By pairing vivid photographs with the globe-trotting author’s own musings, Mikati—born in Lebanon, raised in Paris, extensively traveled—highlights 50 locales, each chosen for being especially vivid, like the so-called Rainbow Mountain in the Peruvian Andes, where mineral deposits turn the mountainsides into ribbons of color. Certain to brighten your coffee table, if not your future travel plans.

(Rizzoli, August 30)

Imagine a City: A Pilot’s Journey Across the Urban World
By Mark Vanhoenacker

RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (17)

Many of us have longed for the life of a pilot, paid to explore the remote corners of the world. Vanhoenacker actually lived it, having left the world of academia to fly commercial airliners for nearly 20 years. This memoir tells of his impression of the cities he encountered. He chronicles experiences in Abu Dhabi and London, Delhi and Sapporo, each one inspiring him to investigate cultural totems like road signs and poetry. A welcome reminder of the joy of hopping on a plane and heading somewhere new—whether you’re in the co*ckpit or coach.

(Knopf, July 5)

  • BOOK COVER IMAGES COURTESY OF THE PUBLISHER

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CultureThe Birth of BondIan Fleming was, in many ways, the prototype for his creation. He cared about the finer things, dressed impeccably, and was a master of espionage—and the martini. A new biography brings his story to life with the pace of a thriller
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RL Mag - The Summer Reading List (2024)

FAQs

What to read in summer 2024? ›

What's on your summer reading list?
  • “Record of a Spaceborn Few ” by Becky Chambers, part of the exquisite “Wayfarers” series, winner of the Hugo Award for Best Series in science fiction or fantasy. ...
  • “Private Equity ” by Carrie Sun. ...
  • “The Sea Around Us ” by Rachel Carson.
2 days ago

How do you get through summer reading? ›

5 Expert-Approved Summer Reading Tips for Kids
  1. Refresh the Reading Nook. Take it outside! ...
  2. Pack a Portable Library. ...
  3. Make Car Trips Conversational. ...
  4. Relocate the Bedtime Read-Aloud Routine for Sleepovers. ...
  5. Add Variety to Your Reading Repertoire.
May 30, 2024

How many books should a 12 year old read over the summer? ›

According to research cited by the National Education Association, giving kids 12 books to read over the summer is as effective as summer school in raising the students' reading scores!

Does summer reading matter? ›

Most kids enrolled in summer reading programs develop an interest in reading, improve their comprehension, and further develop their memory skills. Reading content material even becomes more interesting.

What are the cons of summer reading? ›

Turning summer reading into required homework teaches students that reading, an enjoyable and enriching activity, is a chore. While many of the assigned summer reading novels are interesting and relevant books, students focus more on annotating the novel rather than being able to actually enjoy the literature.

What age is the summer reading challenge for? ›

The Summer Reading Challenge is aimed at children from 4-11 years old. It supports this age group and their families by: Preparing children to get back to the classroom in the autumn. Supporting the move into a new year group or key stage.

What happens if you don't read over the summer? ›

Research shows that children who don't read over the course of the summer typically score lower on standardized tests at the end of summer vacation than they do at the beginning. It's easy to minimize the impact of a few months off. Everyone needs a break now and then, right?

What is a good summer reading goal? ›

Example Goals: Find time to read every day ● Read at least 140 minutes a week ● Read 10 books ● Choose all your books from a specific genre or a mix of genres: (historical fiction, adventure, mystery, science fiction, fantasy, memoir, biography, history, informational, poetry, etc.)

Should you read during the summer? ›

Summer reading is critical to a child's ability to not only retain information learned the previous year, but also to grow in knowledge and critical thinking skills for the coming year.

What are summer reads? ›

What to Read This Summer
  • Don Quixote. by Miguel de Cervantes, translated by John Rutherford (Penguin Classics) ...
  • The Phantom Tollbooth. by Norton Juster (Random House) ...
  • In the Freud Archives. by Janet Malcolm (New York Review Books) ...
  • Suttree. ...
  • Lonesome Dove. ...
  • My Life as a Body. ...
  • Landscape for a Good Woman. ...
  • The Puttermesser Papers.
Jun 26, 2024

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